Repost: A Meditation on Something I Heard the Other Day

On Friday, October 11th, I attended a professional development workshop at the college where I’m employed.  The title of the session was “Communication Skills for Collaboration.”  Looking back, I don’t think the title gave an apt preview of what the talk would cover.  Plus, the title was boring; whereas, the actually workshop was quite interesting. During the early moments of the presentation, the presenter began … Continue reading Repost: A Meditation on Something I Heard the Other Day

Repost: On Dealing with Emotional Extremes

I’m getting older.  We all are.  Of course, as we age, we lose things.  For example, because I’m older and injured my knee playing competitive sports when I was a young guy, I can no longer jog without having significant pain afterwards.  That sucks, but I’m fine with that limitation and loss. It’s not all bad news though.  I’m gaining things too.  For example, I … Continue reading Repost: On Dealing with Emotional Extremes

group of people putting their hands together

Survival of the Friendliest: The Key to Our Species’ Evolution

The book Humankind by the Dutch historian Rutger Bregman is the inspiration for this blog post. The author invites us to explore a different perspective. He argues that people are inherently decent at heart and proposes a new worldview based on the corollaries of this optimistic view of human beings. He explores, among other things, the concept of survival of the friendliest. When it comes … Continue reading Survival of the Friendliest: The Key to Our Species’ Evolution

diverse women looking at camera

Why We Must Tolerate Intolerance

The Paradox of Tolerance Back in the 1940s, a philosopher named Karl Popper came up with something called “The Paradox of Tolerance.” He said that if everyone tolerates every idea, then intolerant ideas will emerge. Tolerate people, being the soft pushovers they are, will tolerate this intolerance. However, the intolerant will not tolerate tolerant people. So, eventually, the tolerant will get rammed up the backside. … Continue reading Why We Must Tolerate Intolerance

Repost: Napping as an Act of Defiance

I’ve been thinking a lot about defiance lately.  Actually, because I’m very much a contrarian at heart, I’m always thinking about ways to defy.  That’s what contrarians do; they defy conventional wisdom (among other things).  (By the way, it seems pretty clear that we need a lot more contrarians in the world.) I guess you could also say that I’m part of the resistance against … Continue reading Repost: Napping as an Act of Defiance

Repost: Does Anyone Know Where I Left My Car Keys?

I’ve been forgetful lately.  I’m talking like, I’ll be in one part of my house, decide that I need something from another room, head to that locale, and as soon as I arrive there, I can no longer recall what I wanted to get.  I know this is a near universal human experience because I’ve had numerous friends, once I’ve told them about this tendency … Continue reading Repost: Does Anyone Know Where I Left My Car Keys?

Repost: On Work and Money: Part Two

If you haven’t already done so, you might want to have a look at part one.  That one was mostly about work.  This second piece will be more focused on money; although, work and money really go hand in hand because without the former, the latter is hard to come by. In part one, I mentioned (and linked to) “The Shame that Keeps Us in Our … Continue reading Repost: On Work and Money: Part Two

Repost: On Work and Money: Part One

Earlier this week I read “The Shame that Keeps Us in Our Jobs,” an article by Paul Millerd, one of my LinkedIn contacts.  Millerd’s piece, about work, work culture, and money, got me thinking about a whole bunch of topics.  This blog is the result of that rumination. I want to begin with something I’ve wondered about throughout my career as a college and university … Continue reading Repost: On Work and Money: Part One

fisheye shot of a person inside a building with columns and ornate ceiling

When God moved into our nation

God moved into our nation and settled there. It was 1979, and I was only seven years old. He took over the country with Ayatollah Khomeini. He was a “man” with a long beard and turban who looked more like an Indian than an Iranian. This text is part of my in-progress memoir, which I plan to publish in the future in the divine timing. Continue reading When God moved into our nation

Repost: Experimenting with Self-Discovery in Real Time

I don’t think this is going to be anything like any of my other blogs.  Actually, I’m not for sure what this is going to look like or how it might turn out.  That’s why I’m calling it an “experiment.” I will conduct my experiment by asking a series of personal, self-discovery questions and then answering them.  Each response will be used to generate another … Continue reading Repost: Experimenting with Self-Discovery in Real Time

Let’s Talk and Think about Skin Color

Note:  A version of this post was published earlier.   As America gears up for the 2024 presidential campaign, a variety of Republican contenders, chief among them Ron DeSantis, are doing their absolute best to dethrone the Grand Poohbah, otherwise known as “The Donald,” the man who gives lie to the statement “It can’t happen here.” To achieve this difficult task, these campaigners are going … Continue reading Let’s Talk and Think about Skin Color

Repost:  What Vladimir Putin’s War Has Taught Me

Before I get into the body of this piece, I’d like to say that the conflict in Ukraine is especially interesting and tragic because I served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Poland during the mid-nineties, not long after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the fall of the Berlin Wall.  I was sent to Rzeczpospolita Polska—I still remember quite a lot of Polish—to … Continue reading Repost:  What Vladimir Putin’s War Has Taught Me

Repost: Others

Life is like a great meandering stroll through a vast wilderness of ever-changing scenery.  Such a long tramp is bound to change us, so it’s highly likely we’ll undergo one transformation after another as we travel. I was an only child during the earliest stages of my “journey.”  I spent the first few years of my life living in a quiet, rural setting where neighbors … Continue reading Repost: Others

light man love people

Is it Better that Ten Guilty Persons Go Free that One Innocent be Convicted?

The law holds that it is better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer. William Blackstone I was planning a completely different post for today but then on Friday last week they announced super good news. Olivier Vandecasteele was released after 455 days of detention in an Iranian prison on alleged charges of espionage and undermining national security. He was innocent. Who … Continue reading Is it Better that Ten Guilty Persons Go Free that One Innocent be Convicted?

Repost:  Can Happiness Be Cultivated?

I’ve been writing about happiness recently.  This is the third (and final) installment in a series of pieces on this subject.  The first installment can be found here and second one, here. While prepping myself to write this, I began to think of analogies.  Can happiness be cultivated in the same way a farmer prepares for a good harvest?  Think about it; a bumper crop doesn’t just happen … Continue reading Repost:  Can Happiness Be Cultivated?

product list written on a blackboard

What Drives People to Buy and Use Sustainable Products 

As you know, there is a huge gap between saying and doing when it comes to sustainable consumption habits (well, when it comes to habits in general). Most of us say we would like to be careful about what we buy, perhaps minimizing waste and the use of single-use plastic bag, or supporting only companies that show care and respect for the environment. Many of us … Continue reading What Drives People to Buy and Use Sustainable Products 

brown wooden shelf with books

In Search of an Inner Life

Is there anything beyond the futility of the external world, governed by fierce competition, ambition and baseless pleasures? Where does one take refuge from the constant treadmill of busyness that encapsulates our day to day working lives? One is inclined to ask, is there anything outside of the status games played within our society, trying impress others through fame, fortune or luxury consumer goods. A … Continue reading In Search of an Inner Life

Sharing is Caring

Dear, Readers, I’m speaking for all Wise & Shine writers when I say that we so appreciate your continued support of this blog.  To show how thankful we are, we want to ask you to share a link to your blog or site in the “thoughts” or comments section at the bottom of this page.  Please feel free to include a statement about what inspires … Continue reading Sharing is Caring

It’s Been Pouring

Most of us are familiar with the old saying, “When it rains, it pours.”  I’ve been thinking a lot about that adage recently because there’s been quite a lot of pouring rain in my life over the past few months. A few weeks ago, I wrote about needing to take a leave of absence from writing for this blog after being diagnosed with a degenerative … Continue reading It’s Been Pouring